Vic’s Classics: The Changeling

When composer John Russell (George C. Scott) loses his wife and daughter in a car wreck, he seeks solace by renting a secluded estate outside Seattle. But the mansion is haunted by the presence of a child who died there more than 80 years ago. Now, Russell must find out who that child was — and why there seems to be a cover-up about his existence. Peter Medak directs this chilling horror classic that inspired many filmmakers.

Victor
Rating: 9 out of 10

It’s very easy to lose and forget films among the barrage of large budget, heavily-advertised Hollywood films and Director Peter Medak’s elegantly frightening film “The Changeling” is possibly one of them. It was 1980 and there was no shortage of demented slashers chasing down nubile coeds in the woods at our local theaters. It was this bombardment of mega-crap that made this eerie haunted house story, set in a Victorian style Mansion in Washington state, stand out to me.

George C. Scott turns in a very earnest and emotional performance as a gruff-voiced music composer who relocates to Washington after losing his family. The Mansion, shot beautifully by John Coquillon, becomes a twisted, cavernous fiend. There are strange, loud noises, running faucets, creaking doors, secret rooms, windows that explode and — my favorite — the haunted wheelchair! Medak weaves a complex tale of murder, deceit and even politics with no slasher or monster in sight. He provides us with very realistic terrors that grip us emotionally. If all that wasn’t enough he supplies us with one of the most unbelievably frightening seances ever put on film. However, the ending felt rushed and abrupt and its conclusion did not compliment all the creepiness before it.

The Changeling is that rare ghost story that transcends the horror genre with a sublime, haunting performance by Scott. There is precise direction by Medak, spooky and involving camerawork and more than a few great scares that will have you yelping like a schoolgirl.

George C. Scott turns in a very earnest and emotional performance as a gruffy voiced Music Composer who re-locates to Washington after he loses his Wife and young Daughter in a winter related car crash in Upstate NY. As he settles in his new home, still grieving and befriending a local played by Trish Van Devere, Director Medak ups the ante and sets the bar high for this genre. The Mansion, shot beautifully by John Coquillon, becomes a twisted, cavernous fiend. There are strange loud noises, running faucets, creaking doors, secret rooms, windows that explode and my favorite the haunted wheelchair! Medak weaves a complex tale of murder, deceit and even politics with no slasher or monster in sight. He provides us with very realistic terrors that grip us emotionally. If all that wasn’t enough he supplies us with one of the most unbelievably frightening seances ever put on film. Yes, the ending felt rushed and abrupt. The conclusion did not compliment all that creepily came before it. But I am nit picking.The Changeling is that rare ghost story that transcends the horror genre (Like Robert Wise’s “The Haunting” before it) with a sublime, haunting performance by Scott. There is precise direction by Medak, Spooky and involving camerawork and more than a few great scares that will have you yelping like a schoolgirl. Highly recommended!

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5 responses to “Vic’s Classics: The Changeling

  1. Oh yeah, when that ball starts bouncing around, watch out.

    • I haven’t seen this one. Vic’s Classics are great because there’s so many older films I haven’t seen. He knows how to pull the gems out.

    • One of the best scenes of the movie is when he gets home after throwing that ball into the river and here it comes down the stairs! Scared the crap outta me! This movie just had the momentum of a runaway train once the scares began…

  2. I saw this on HBO when I was growing up, the ball coming back down the stairs scared the crap out of me as well.
    Having not seen this since I was a wee lad, I’m inclined to give it another run. Good choice Vic!

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